Useful Resources and Publications:

 

Table of Contents

For LGBT Individuals

Updating Legal Documents for Transgender People
LGBT Healthcare
LGBT Housing and Houselessness
LGBT Youth
Federal and Workplace Rights
Immigration
LGBT and Sex Work
Transgender and Intersex Incarceration
#Resist
Policy Proposals

For Employers, Coworkers, and Care Providers
Community Partners

 
 

For LGBT Individuals:

National Transgender Discrimination Survey

In 2016, NCTE released the report of the U.S. Transgender Survey (USTS), a second iteration of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey (NTDS), that measures how things are now and how they have changed over the past five years since the release of the NTDS. With almost 28,000 respondents, the USTS is the largest survey ever devoted to the lives and experiences of trans people. Read the report at http://ustranssurvey.org.

In 2011, NCTE and the National LGBTQ Task Force released the report of the NTDS. Interviews with over 6,400 transgender and gender non-conforming people made it the largest such study at the time it was conducted. The study has been a game changer—both for our policy work and for cultural change. For the first time, we were able to quantify the discrimination and violence transgender people face. The findings from the NTDS are available in multiple reports that cover specific subpopulations and issues.

Transgender people face discrimination and violence throughout society, from their family growing up, in school, at work, by homeless shelters, by doctors, in emergency rooms, before judges, by landlords, and even police officers.
Full Report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)
By Region
By State
Asian American, South Asian, Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander Respondents (PDF) (English, 简化字, 繁體字, हिन्दी, ភាសាខ្មែរ, 한국어, Tagalog, ภาษาไทย, tiếng Việt, தமிழ்)
American Indian and Alaskan Native Respondents (English)
Multiracial Respondents (English)
Black Respondents (English)
Latino/a Respondents (PDF) (English, Español)

Updating Legal Documents for Transgender People

ID Please: Full Guide to Changing California and Federal Identity Documents

From the Transgender Law Center, This comprehensive publication is a guide for navigating processes of updating California and federal identity documents to reflect accurate gender markers. 
Read here

State-by-State Overview: Changing Gender Markers on Birth Certificates

The policies for changing gender markers on birth certificates vary state by state, resulting in a complicated patchwork of processes across the country. This resource from the TLC provides an overview of which states have a process for updating gender markers on birth certificates, and provides the basic outline of what those states’ policies look like. 
Read here

NCTE ID Documents Center

The NCTE’s one-stop hub for name and gender change information. Find out how to get a legal name change where you live and update your name/gender on state and federal IDs and records.
Read here

Fact Sheet: California’s Nonbinary Gender Recognition Act (SB 179)

California’s Gender Recognition Act (SB 179), signed into law on October 15, 2017, makes it significantly easier for all transgender people who are living in or were born in California to obtain identity documents that reflect their genders, and makes California the second state in the county to offer a standard path to obtaining a nonbinary gender marker on state documents.
Read here
Bill Text

Changing Birth Certificate Sex Designations: State-By-State Guidelines

Amending the sex designation on a birth certificate may be an extremely important step for a transgender person, to accurately reflect on this legal document the sex with which the individual identifies, and as required proof of sex to obtain other identity and legal documents. The requirements and process to change the sex designation on a birth certificate, and whether that is even possible, varies from state to state. The following is a list of legal authorities intended to assist with the process of changing the sex on a birth certificate. The information has been compiled from various sources, including standard legal materials and anecdotal accounts of practices in various states. It may not be current, and should be confirmed before being relied upon in any particular circumstance.
Read here

A Transgender Advocate’s Guide to Updating and Amending School Records

Under Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 C.F.R. §§ 99.00 et seq.), students, current or former, have a right to seek to amend their school records if said records are “inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of the student’s rights of privacy.” (34 C.F.R. § 99.7(a)(2)(ii)). Transgender students wishing to change their name and gender marker on their educational records can seek such an amendment under this federal law.
Read here (PDF)

LGBT Healthcare

Crisis Care Toolkit: A Legal Resource Guide for Orlando Victims and Families (Guía Práctica para Manejo de Crisis: Una Guía de Recursos Legales para las Víctimas de Orlando y sus Familias)

A coalition of LGBTQ advocacy groups: The Human Rights Campaign (HRC), Immigration Equality, Lambda Legal, the LGBT Institute at the Center for Civil and Human Rights, the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), the National Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR), the National LGBT Bar Association, Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, Out Leadership, the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund (TLDEF), the Williams Institute, and the law firm of Littler Mendelson have assembled this resource guide on benefits that may be available in this time of need. This toolkit is not intended to be legal advice and does not constitute legal advice.
Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

When Health Care Isn’t Caring: Lambda Legal’s Survey on Discrimination Against LGBT People and People Living with HIV (Cuando la atención a la salud no pone atención: Encuesta de Lambda Legal sobre la discriminación contra personas LGBT y personas con el VIH)

This survey is the first to examine refusal of care and barriers to health care among LGBT and HIV communities on a national scale. We hope that these data will influence decisions being made about how health care is delivered in this country now and in the future.
Read here (English)
Lea aquí (Español)

Guidelines for the Primary and Gender-Affirming Care of Transgender and Gender Nonbinary People

The Center of Excellence for Transgender Health (CoE) at the University of California – San Francisco is proud to present these Guidelines for the Primary and Gender-Affirming Care of Transgender and Gender Nonbinary People. Transgender people have a gender identity that differs from the sex which they were assigned at birth, and are estimated to represent 0.5% of the U.S. population. Numerous needs assessments have demonstrated that transgender people encounter a range of barriers to accessing primary health care. A 2006 survey of more than 600 transgender people in California found that 30% postponed seeking medical care due to prior disrespect or discrimination, and that 10% were denied primary care outright. The 2011 National Transgender Discrimination Survey of more than 6000 transgender people in all 50 U.S. states found several noteworthy disparities, including 28% who delayed care due to past discrimination and 19% who were denied care outright. Most alarmingly, 50% of respondents reported having to teach their providers about their own healthcare.
Read here

LGBT Housing and Houselessness

Shelter for All Genders: Best Practices for Homeless Shelters, Services, and Programs in Massachusetts in Serving Transgender Adults and Gender Non-Conforming Guests

Transgender and gender non-conforming people continue to experience overwhelming levels of harassment and discrimination in shelters and programs across the Commonwealth and nation. Homelessness within the trans community is critically common. A 2009 study by the National Center for Transgender Equality and the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force reports about 1 in 5 transgender people have been refused housing, and 19% have experienced homelessness at some point in their lives due to transgender-related discrimination. Of transgender people who have tried to access shelters, 55% have experienced harassment by shelter staff or residents, 29% were turned away altogether, and a staggering 22% experienced sexual assault by residents or staff. Furthermore, those trans people in the study who have experienced homelessness were highly vulnerable to mistreatment in public settings, police abuse, and negative health outcomes. Additionally, the 2011 Institute of Medicine report on the health of LGBT people affirms the significant risk of homelessness among young transgender people. The overwhelming evidence indicates the necessity for safety and accessibility to homeless shelters and programs for transgender and gender non-conforming people.
Read here (PDF)

LGBT Homelessness

Years of research and countless studies have repeatedly shown that discrimination threatens not only access to housing but the stability of communities. Members of the LGBT community are more likely to become homeless, and once homeless, more likely to endure discrimination and harassment that extends their homelessness. LGBT youth experiencing homelessness are at particular risk. Between 20 and 40 percent of all homeless youth identify as members of the LGBT community, and for them, homelessness or the threat of homelessness frequently forces youth into survival behaviors that jeopardize their wellbeing and safety.
Read here

Know Your Rights | Housing and Homeless Shelters

This document outlines the housing rights of transgender people and how to file complaints of housing discrimination. While we still desperately need a national law that explicitly prohibits discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation, existing laws provide real protection in many situations. While NCTE does not provide legal services, we encourage any person who cannot resolve housing issues through federal, state, or local fair housing complaint processes to seek legal help.
Read here

LGBT Youth

Survival Tips for Trans Youth

Transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) youth face serious legal obstacles, and many endure discrimination and violence on a daily basis, whether in school, health care or the criminal justice system.The challenges of changing one’s name, finding access to hormones or enduring police brutality, for instance, demand a distinctly adult set of skills and can take their toll on a young person.
Read here (PDF)

FAQ on the Withdrawal of Federal Guidance on Transgender Students

In May 2016, the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education released historic guidance for the nation’s schools on the needs and rights of hundreds of thousands of students who are transgender. The guidance summarized over a decade of case law and best practices from across the country, advising schools that under the federal Title IX law, schools should treat trans students according to their gender identity.

The guidance was widely hailed by education and child health experts. But just days after Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos were confirmed, the Trump administration announced they would be rolling back the guidance. Parents, students, teachers, and others across the country are rightfully concerned about what this means for them or their trans loved ones. Here’s what you need to know.
Read here

Bending the Mold: An Action Kit for Transgender Students

Whether you’re transgender or gender non-conforming, questioning, or an ally, this kit is designed to help you make your school a safer place. We’ve included ideas and information to help you advocate for change. There’s also an extensive list of resources to help you connect with the transgender community and find support.
Read here (PDF)

Beyond the Binary: A Tool Kit for Gender Identity Activism In Schools

The Beyond the Binary tool kit is designed for student leaders, activists, and gender non-conformers who want to challenge the gender binary system in schools by ensuring gender-inclusive policies exist in schools and by raising awareness about gender through education of students and staff about gender non-conformity and transgender issues. It is essential that student organizers focus on the big picture when setting out to do a gender identity campaign. That means you need to make race, class, and sexual orientation issues, along with gender, central to the education and campaign work you undertake. The “big picture” means creating a safer environment for all students, recognizing how gender issues affect students of all races, classes, and sexual orientations.
Read here (PDF)

Federal and Workplace Rights

Know Your Rights

These resources outline the rights and procedures transgender employees have to address discrimination. While we still desperately need a national law that explicitly prohibits discrimination based on gender identity and sexual orientation, existing laws provide real protection in many situations.
“Know Your Rights: Transgender People at Work” (TLC)
“Know Your Rights|Employment (General)” (NCTE)

Voting While Trans: Preparing for Voter ID Laws

Regardless of whether you have ever had trouble voting in the past, this year, voter ID laws may make it harder for many trans people to vote. Even if you have the required ID, the new laws may encourage additional scrutiny toward and bias against trans voters. It is important that every trans person takes steps now to make sure they can vote on Election Day. This was written to give all trans people the information they need to be able to cast their votes and to respond to possible problems at polling places.
Read here

Transgender Rights Toolkit: A Legal Guide For Trans People and Their Advocates (Guía de derechos trans: recursos legales para personas transexuales y transgénero, y sus defensores)

Violence is a plague in the lives of many transgender and gender-nonconforming (TGNC) people, with hate-motivated beatings and murders very common, often involving extra cruelty. According to the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, 44% of reported hate murders in 2010 were committed against transgender women. This terror-by-example causes the kind of fear that sends people underground, away from community services and support.
Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

Transgender Rights Toolkit: A Legal Guide for Trans People and Their Advocates

Within this Transgender Rights Toolkit, readers will find answers to many questions that transgender people and their advocates may ask as they navigate through life. This toolkit is meant to be a resource and advocacy tool designed to educate and empower a community often left outside the walls of power.

While transgender people are gaining visibility in the media, the daily lived experiences of transgender people is fraught with discrimination and oppression. They live and work in a world not suited to meet their basic needs. Through education, advocacy and litigation, Lambda Legal’s Transgender Rights Project has been able to ease, overcome and combat the pervasive discrimination that transgender people face.
Read here

Transgender People and Marriage Laws

It may seem obvious that the government has no business weighing in on your gender when it comes to whom you marry. Yet LGBT people continue to endure interference at the state and federal levels when it comes to respect for their relationships. This discriminatory landscape has permitted some courts—often at the behest of hostile ex-spouses—to invalidate marriages where one or both parties is transgender.

Transgender people going through divorces, inheritance battles or custody disputes are particularly vulnerable to legal challenges to the validity of their marriages because the rules out there are so inconsistent. Some states recognize a person’s gender transition for purposes of entering a different-sex marriage; others don’t. Some states allow same-sex couples to marry; others don’t.
Read here (PDF)

Immigration

ICE Raids: Know Your Rights as a TGNC Immigrant (Redadas de ICE: Que Necesitas Saber Si Eres es Un Inmigrante TGNC)


Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

Credible Fear Interviews: What you Need to Know as a TGNC Immigrant (Las Entrevistas de Miedo Creíbles: Que Necesitas Saber Si Eres es Un Inmigrante TGNC)


Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

Our Moment for Reform: Immigration and Transgender People

Shortcomings and inequities in current US immigration law impact tens of thousands of transgender people and family members. According to the Williams Institute at UCLA, there are approximately 267,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adult undocumented immigrants living in the United States. We estimate that between 15,000 and 50,000 of these undocumented adults are transgender, based on existing data on the trans population as a fraction of the US population and LGBT population. The actual number may be higher because many people may be reluctant to identify themselves as transgender.This report builds off of the Center for American Progress’s Living in Dual Shadows report, which presented the issues affecting LGBT undocumented people in the United States. Our goal is to highlight the concerns of transgender immigrants as an especially vulnerable group within the immigration system. We hope this report will aid advocacy organizations and policy makers alike to include a consideration of trans immigrants’ rights in their work toward Comprehensive Immigration Reform.
Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

“Do You See How Much I’m Suffering Here?” Abuse against Transgender Women in US Immigration Detention

At any given time, the United States holds scores of transgender women in immigration detention, including many who have fled to the US seeking protection from torture, sexual violence, and other forms of persecution in their home countries related to their gender identity or gender expression.
Read here

Transgender Rights Toolkit: A Legal Guide For Trans People and Their Advocates

This fact sheet provides basic information for transgender immigrants in the U.S. regarding some of the most common problems.
Read here (PDF)

LGBT and Sex Work

Meaningful Work: Transgender Experiences in the Sex Trade

The National Transgender Discrimination Survey (NTDS) examined the experiences of over 6,400 transgender adults across the United States in 2008-2009. To date, it remains the largest reported survey of transgender people in the US. The NTDS found that transgender people overall experiences high levels of discrimination in every area of life, as well as high levels of poverty, unemployment, homelessness, negative interactions with police, incarceration, and violent victimization. As a result, many transgender people participate in the sex trade in order to earn income or as an alternative to relying on homeless shelters and food banks. The criminalizing and stigmatizing of sex work in the United States can worsen the discrimination and marginalization that transgender people already face in society. Trans sex workers experience harassment and violence, often at the hands of police, and these experiences are heightened for transgender people of color, especially women.
Executive Summary (PDF)
Full Report (PDF)

SJI Bad Date List

The Bad Date List is a community-based violence intervention tool utilized by sex workers to share information regarding “bad dates.” A Bad Date may be any person who threatens, behaves violently towards, robs, extorts, or engages in any behavior that violates the agreed upon terms and boundaries of the exchange. This list may also be used to report bad encounters with law enforcement.
Read here

SJI Training and Support Groups

St. James Infirmary offers weekly trainings, workshops, and groups for current & former sex workers of all genders spanning a variety of topics and encompassing many approaches. Trainings are grounded in principles of harm reduction, both methods and activities, and primarily concentrate on specific aspects of working conditions as well as mental health, substance use and socially constructed issues influencing behavior that can put our community at risk for occupational illness and disease.
Read here

Transgender and Intersex Incarceration

Standing With LGBT Prisoners: An Advocate’s Guide to Ending Abuse and Combating Imprisonment

Jails are traumatizing and often dangerous places, especially for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, and anyone who is gender nonconforming. In a country that incarcerates more of its people than any other in the world, LGBT people are more likely to end up behind bars, and more likely to face abuse behind bars. Being LGBT in a US jail or prison often means daily humiliation, physical and sexual abuse, and fearing it will get worse if you complain. Many LGBT people are placed in solitary confinement for months or years just because of who they are. Fortunately, advocates across the country are working to change this. Today, there are new national standards, legal developments, and other new tools—as well as many allies beyond the LGBT community who are combating mass incarceration and abuse behind bars—that make this a better time than ever to press for change.
Read here

LGBT People and the Prison Rape Elimination Act

Sexual abuse is rampant in prison and detention facilities today, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender nonconforming people are among those most at risk. To address this crisis, Congress unanimously passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in 2003. After nearly a decade of study and review, the U.S. Department of Justice issued final regulations to implement PREA in May 2012.

These rules represent an historic step toward ending the crisis of sexual abuse in confinement. This resource outlines key protections provided by the PREA Standards and what they mean for LGBT people.
Read here

“It’s War in Here”: A Report on the Treatment of Transgender and Intersex People in New York State Men’s Prisons

‘It’s War in Here’: A Report on the Treatment of Transgender and Intersex People in New York State Men’s Prisons, one of the first to address this issue, draws on interviews with imprisoned transgender people and their advocates to document the widespread harassment, physical and sexual abuse, discrimination, and violence that transgender, intersex, and gender non-conforming people face inside state custody.

It’s War in Here illustrates the cycles of poverty and discrimination that result in so many transgender and gender non-conforming people being poor, homeless, and imprisoned, and is a valuable resource in educating policy-makers, attorneys, service providers, and community organizations about this urgent issue.
Read here (PDF)

Know Your Rights: Laws, Court Decisions, and Advocacy Tips to Protect Transgender Prisoners

This guide identifies laws, court decisions, advocacy tips, and other resources that may be helpful for adult transgender prisoners. Each transgender person’s experience in prison and jail is different, in part because the conditions vary a great deal from one prison to another and change over time. However, the safety and health of every transgender prisoner in the United States is guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution no matter where the prisoner is held. And the recently-released Prison Rape Elimination Act (“PREA”) standards provide additional support for the protection of transgender prisoners. Both PREA and the Constitution protect prisoners even if they are kept in a privately run facility and even if the medical or correctional staff are not government employees.
Read here (PDF)

#Resist

Participating in Direct Actions: A Guide for Transgender People

Direct actions, protests, and acts of civil disobedience are powerful tools for change. Participating in these actions may also put you at risk of arrest and/or mistreatment by police and in jail. When participating in direct actions, transgender people should understand their rights and take necessary precautions before accepting the risk of arrest. If you are planning on attending a protest and you are not transgender, consider what you can do to prevent mistreatment of transgender people and other vulnerable participants. From identity documents to detainment procedures, this resource offers an overview of the considerations transgender people should think about when preparing or participating in a direct action.
Read here (PDF) (English)
Lea aquí (PDF) (Español)

Responding to Hate Crimes: A Community Resource Manual

Hate crimes are devastating events, both for the victim and for the community in which they occur. How we respond to them, as transgender advocates and allies, is very important. This manual provides you with some of the tools to create an effective response to a hate crime after it has happened in your community.

This manual is designed to help you develop a comprehensive and integrated response to a hate crime. This involves working with the victim, friends and family, and the media; educating law enforcement officials; and coordinating with local activists, concerned community members, and sometimes with national organizations. Addressing each of these areas is essential in order to respond effectively to hate crimes.
Read here

Policy Proposals

A Blueprint for Equality: A Federal Agenda For Transgender People

This updated document represents a comprehensive and up-to-date review of federal policies that can impact trans people, providing a blueprint for the next phase of federal policy change. We now also list the federal policy advances we have collectively made so that we may all celebrate the forward movement toward transgender equality together
Read here (PDF)

Fact Sheet: Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA)

The Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) would, if passed, prohibit employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. ENDA would create explicit protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people similar to those available under existing federal anti-discrimination laws for other protected classes of workers. America prospers when all are given basic protections for economic and job security. Thus, ENDA is a critical piece of legislation to help ensure job security for millions of people and families in the United States.
Read Here

One Strike and You’re Out: How We Can Eliminate Barriers to Economic Security and Mobility for People with Criminal Records (Editorial)

The United States must craft policies to ensure that Americans with criminal records have a fair shot at a decent life for themselves and their families. Editorial by Associate Director of the Poverty to Prosperity Program at the Center for American Progress Rebecca Vallas, and Community Legal Services litigation director Sharon Dietrich.
Read Here

Immigration Reform for LGBT Individuals (Fact Sheet)

Shortcomings and inequities in current United States immigration law impact an estimated 267,000 LGBT adult undocumented immigrants, of which an estimated 15,000 to 50,000 are transgender, along with their families. In a population that is already highly marginalized, transgender immigrants are among the most vulnerable to discrimination and violence, including in the immigration system itself. Often, transgender immigrants are disproportionately affected by problems in our current immigration system, especially with regard to family recognition and unification, asylum, detention, solitary confinement, and employer verification issues. We need immigration reform to address the systemic problems that affect all immigrants and especially those who suffer additional injustices because of their transgender status.
Read Here

Free Our Future: An Immigration Policy Platform for Beyond the Trump Era

The escalated war on immigrants by the Trump regime, most recently exposed through the horrific separation of migrant parents and children, has struck a nerve and mobilized millions. This moment calls for bold vision and action. This document provides a vision matching the severity of the threats we face. We offer immigration policies that not only call for the abolition of immigration enforcement agencies, but for full-scale decriminalization of immigration. Our policy demands are bold by design. It is time to push forward reforms that can contend with the horrific harm we are witnessing as parents and children are torn apart.
Read Here

A Roadmap for Change: Federal Policy Recommendations for Addressing the Criminalization of LGBT People and People Living with HIV

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people and people living with HIV (PLWH) face pervasive discrimination at all stages of the criminal legal system, from policing, to adjudication, to incarceration, according to a new report published by the Center for Gender & Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School and co-authored by the Center for American Progress, The Center for HIV Law & Policy, and Streetwise & Safe (SAS).
Read Here

 

For Employers, Coworkers, and Care Providers:

Model Trans Employment Policy

Published by the Trans Employment Program and Transgender Law Center, this model policy and guide will clarify the law and help your company welcome and include transgender, gender non-conforming, and transitioning employees. 
Read here

Guidance Regarding the Employment of Transgender Individuals in the Federal Workplace

The purpose of this memorandum is to provide guidance to address some of the common questions that agencies have raised with the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) regarding the employment of transgender individuals in the Federal workplace. Some of these questions pertain to areas for which OPM has responsibility and others pertain to areas over which other agencies have responsibility.
Read here

Moving Beyond Bias: How To Ensure Access to Justice for LGBT People

This curriculum was created to provide a model for educating judges, attorneys and other legal professionals about sexual orientation, gender identity and the needs of LGBT people in the legal system. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the accompanying PowerPoint presentation. Systemic bias and discrimination impede access to justice in the courts for LGBT people and people living with HIV; this is especially true for transgender people, people of color and others with multiple marginalized identities. Such biases are greatly reduced in the face of information about the lives of LGBT people.
Read here

Model District Policy on Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students

This document presents a Model District Policy on Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Students, which outlines best practices for schools to ensure that all students are safe, included and respected in school, regardless of their gender identity or expression — including transgender and gender nonconforming students. The model presents some policy objectives, key points and alternatives to consider. It is meant to be adaptable to the specific needs of your school district, while keeping the original intent of the policy intact. Depending on your school district, the policy language provided here may fit best in a district policy, an administrative regulation, or a combination of the two. Our model was developed by examining school district policies from various states, guidance provided by states and the federal government, and identifying best practices for a national context.
Read here (PDF)

Schools in Transition: A Guide for Supporting Transgender Students in K-12 Schools

Today’s society is recognizing the experiences and needs of transgender people as never before. This trend is most evident in our nation’s schools, where an increasing number of transgender and gender-expansive students live openly as their authentic selves. At the same time, parents, students, educators, administrators and other stakeholders are working together to determine the best ways to support these students. This guide highlights best practices while offering strategies for building upon and aligning them with each school’s culture.
Read here (PDF)

Transitioning Our Shelters: A Guide to Making Homeless Shelters Safe for Transgender People

Homelessness is a crisis in the United States. An estimated 3.5 million people experience homelessness each year. Homeless shelters are struggling to meet this need without sufficient resources. A recent review of homelessness in 50 cities found that in virtually every city, the city’s official estimated number of homeless people greatly exceeded the number of beds in emergency shelter and transitional housing. Congressional budget cuts have made operating these shelters increasingly difficult, as they are forced to provide more services with less resources. With all of these challenges, it can be hard for shelters to figure out how to make their shelters safe for transgender people. This publication is for shelters that wish to make their shelters safe for all people by making a few minor but important policy adjustments.
Read here

The Radical Copyeditor’s Style Guide for Writing about Transgender People

A style guide for writing about transgender people is practically an oxymoron. Style guides are designed to create absolutes—bringing rules and order to a meandering and contradictory patchwork quilt of a language. Yet there are no absolutes when it comes to gender. That’s why this is a radical copyeditor’s style guide. Radical copyediting isn’t about absolutes; it’s about context and care.
Read here

 

Community Partners and Resources:

SF LGBT Center logoThe SF LGBT Center

http://www.sfcenter.org/
The mission of the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Community Center is to connect our diverse community to opportunities, resources and each other to achieve our vision of a stronger, healthier, and more equitable world for LGBT people and our allies.

 

TransThrive_Logo2015_HiResTRANS:THRIVE @ API Wellness Center

http://www.apiwellness.org/trans_thrive.html
We transform lives by advancing health, wellness, and equality.

 

 

 

CUAV logo high resCommunity United Against Violence

http://www.cuav.org/
Founded in 1979, CUAV works to build the power of LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) communities to transform violence and oppression. We support the healing and leadership of those impacted by abuse and mobilize our broader communities to replace cycles of trauma with cycles of safety and liberation. As part of the larger social justice movement, CUAV works to create truly safe communities where everyone can thrive.

 

 

ella_logoEl/La Para Translatinas

http://ellaparatranslatinas.yolasite.com/
We work to build a world where we transLatinas feel we deserve to protect, love and develop ourselves. By building this base, we support transLatinas in protecting ourselves against violence, abuse and illness.

 

 

FM_logo_whtFresh Meat Productions

http://freshmeatproductions.org/
Fresh Meat Productions builds community through the arts by creating, presenting and touring year-round transgender arts programs. Fresh Meat Productions is first organization of it’s kind in the nation.

 

 

lyonmartinLyon Martin/Health 360

http://lyon-martin.org/
Lyon-Martin Health Services provides excellent health care to women, lesbians and transgender people in a safe and compassionate environment, with sensitivity to sexual orientation and gender identity; all services are regardless of ability to pay.

 

 

NCLR logoNCLR

http://www.nclrights.org/
NCLR is a national legal organization committed to advancing the civil and human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families through litigation, legislation, policy, and public education.

 

 

SF Pride logoSF Pride

http://www.sfpride.org/
The Mission of the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Pride Celebration Committee is to educate the world, commemorate our heritage, celebrate our culture, and liberate our people.

 

 

Shine Study LOGOThe Shine Study

http://www.theshinestudy.org/
The SHINE Study is the first longitudinal study of trans*female youth ages 16-24 in the San Francisco Bay Area. For the first time in history, over 300 SHINE’ers in the San Francisco Bay Area have shared their experiences with us in this groundbreaking effort to inform society, science and policy makers about the ways in which risk and resilience is constructed!

 

 

sji_logo_largecross2-copySt. James Infirmary

http://stjamesinfirmary.org/wordpress/
The Mission of the St. James Infirmary is to provide free, compassionate and nonjudgmental healthcare and social services for sex workers (current or former) of all genders and sexual orientations while preventing occupational illnesses and injuries through a comprehensive continuum of services.

 

 

 

 

TAJA_logo_squareTAJA’s Coalition

http://tajascoalition.org/
Driven by the leadership of trans women of color, along with individual and organizational allies, the mission of TAJA’s Coalition is to stop the genocide of trans women of color.

 

 

TGIJP logoTGI Justice Project

http://tgijp.org/
TGI Justice Project is a group of transgender people—inside and outside of prison—creating a united family in the struggle for survival and freedom.
We work in collaboration with others to forge a culture of resistance and resilience to strengthen us for the fight against imprisonment, police violence, racism, poverty, and societal pressures. We seek to create a world rooted in self determination, freedom of expression, and gender justice.

 

 

transmarch logoTrans March

http://transmarch.org/
The mission of the San Francisco Trans March is to inspire all trans and gender non­conforming people to realize a world where we are safe, loved, and empowered. We strive to create a space for our diverse communities to unite and achieve the social justice and equality that each of us deserves.

 

 

tlc_logoTransgender Law Center

http://transgenderlawcenter.org/
Mission: Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.

 

 

Center of Excellence for Transgender Health logoCenter of Excellence for Transgender Health

http://transhealth.ucsf.edu/
The mission of the Center of Excellence for Transgender Health is to increase access to comprehensive, effective, and affirming health care services for trans and gender­variant communities.

 

 

Dimensions Clinic logoDimensions Clinic

http://www.dimensionsclinic.org/
The mission of the Dimensions Collaborative is to combine efforts across agencies to develop health care programs and services that increase health care access and education for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex & Questioning Youth.

 

 

NCTE logoNational Center for Transgender Equality

http://www.transequality.org/

 

 

AHP logoAlliance Health Project

UCSF Division of LGBTQ Services
http://www.ucsf-ahp.org/

 

 

GENEQ logoGender Equity Resource Center

http://https://campusclimate.berkeley.edu/students/ejce/geneq/

 

 

EQCA logoEquality California

http://www.eqca.org/

 

 

NCTE logoGLAAD

http://www.glaad.org”/

 

 

Native American Health Center logoNative American Health Center

http://www.nativehealth.org/

 

 

LYRIC logoLyric Center for LGBTQQ Youths

http://www.lyric.org/

 

 

The Pacific Center for Human Growth logoThe Pacific Center for Human Growth

http://www.pacificcenter.org/

 

 

NCTE logoOut & Equal

http://www.outandequal.org/

 

 

Queer at Berkeley logoQueer at Berkeley

http://queer.berkeley.edu/

 

 

 

 

CCSF logoQueer Resource Center – City College

https://www.ccsf.edu/en/student-services/student-activities/qrc.html/

 

 

 

 

It Gets Better Project logoIt Gets Better Projecty

http://www.itgetsbetter.org/

 

 

 

 

PFLAG logoPFLAG

http://www.pflagsf.org/

 

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